Snapshot
Wildlife Trust of India (WTI)
SECTOR: Animal Welfare
SUB SECTOR: Wildlife
% Spent on beneficiaries
92%
Financial Score:
Age: 23 Years
Tax Benefit: 50%
Foreign donations:
Location: Pan India
Location(s): Work in progress.
Issues Addressed:
Conflict mitigation; Saving habitats/forests; Augmenting livelihoods
Supported by:
Apollo Tyres; Charities Aid Foundation; HCL Foundation; ONGC; UNDP India
Key Trustees:
Prasad Menon, Chairman; Dr Parimal Bhattacharjee Trustee and Vice Chairman; Vivek Menon, Founder, Trustee and Executive Director; Tara Gandhi, Trustee; Dr Raman Sukumar, Trustee; Mrinal Pande, Trustee;
Recognition: Conde Nast Excellence Award; The Clark R Bavin Award
Sector Comparison:
Beneficiary Spend:
Average: 77.8% Highest: 91.4% Lowest: 49.1%
Income:
Average: Rs2 cr Highest: Rs9 cr Lowest: Rs1 lac
How much to donate
  • Rs1500 provides a bag of rice as relief to a family whose crop is lost to elephant depredation
  • Rs5000 provides an LPG connection to a family dependent on forest for fuelwood
  • Rs10,000 helps a forest dependent family start an alternative livelihood like poultry/ piggery, bio farming
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Committed to the Service of Nature
  • What began as a three-member team in a small room in south Delhi in 1998, is today an organisation of about 150 dedicated professionals from diverse backgrounds - conservation biologists, scientists, sociologists, wildlife veterinarians, managers, lawyers, finance experts and communication specialists - but committed to the common cause of wildlife and working towards achieving the vision of a secure natural heritage of India, in six priority landscapes, knit holistically together by nine key strategies or Big Ideas.
  • Programs: i) Rapid Action Project owes its genesis to the realization that wildlife in India is plagued by innumerable threats that require an immediate response- whether it’s human-wildlife conflict mitigation, equipping frontline forest staff, rescuing and rehabilitating endangered species, building community support for conservation, or protecting habitats.

    ii) Right of Passage- To secure a future for wild elephants it is essential to ensure their uninterrupted movement between key habitats. WTI’s aim has been to protect and secure elephant corridors, while simultaneously rehabilitating people affected by conflict in corridor areas.

    iii) Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC)- was established with a primary aim to stablise displaced animals and release them back into the wild, as close to the site of rescue as possible, following necessary treatment. The centre follows accepted international protocols and guidelines during rescue, treatment and rehabilitation of displaced or distressed animals.
  • Outcome: WTI has trained over 19,000 frontline wildlife staff of over 150 Protected Areas, provided ex-gratia assurance to over 20,000 staff against death or injury on duty, succeeded in securing six elephant corridors, saved lives of over 45,000 animals, provided more than 5000 beneficiaries with green livelihoods, protected 1182 sq.km of natural habitat, created 7 protected areas and created awareness among 25,00,000+ children on conservation.
Income
Rs
24 cr
Expense
Rs
21 cr
Source : Audit Report 2020