New-age forms of philanthropy!

There are many ways in which you can donate to charitable organisations. Most donors prefer to write out a cheque, drop cash into a box or personally hand over money to NGOs with which they are familiar. Other donors are rocking that boat a little. These philanthropists engage establish sophisticated instruments to generate funds for their pet causes. We introduce new-age forms of philanthropy!

More popular:

  • Shares, stocks, and interest: Azim Premji donated shares worth Rs12,300 crore[2] to a trust that will fund the Azim Premji Foundation and his other philanthropic entities. Bill Gates, meanwhile, funds the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation with the sale of Microsoft shares[3]. He and his wife have signed a pledge to eventually give away 95% of their wealth to charity[4]. Rakesh Jhunjhunwala currently gives away 25% of his dividend income from investments to philanthropy[5]. These gifts are a way of creating assets for non-profits that they could not otherwise have amassed.
  • Donor-advised funds: Community Foundations work as grant-making bodies that pool donor funds to create a multiplier effect. Donors can choose sectors to which they can give their money, set up donor advised funds or have the money go into a common pool. The money is then directed to organisations working for beneficiaries in the area. The Silicon Valley Community Foundation is best known for the donations it has received from Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, Go Pro founders and other internet giants. It now houses 1650 philanthropic funds and manages $4.7 billion in assets.[1]

Lesser known:

  • ‘1% equity’: Tech companies are known to make millionaires of founders overnight. Several young co-founders are starting to pledge 1% of equity. The 1% will be donated to the charity of their choice when the business is sold, so it works as a future investment for founders who desire to give to charity but don’t have the money. The plus point: 1% can turn into a huge amount depending on how much the company got acquired for. Australian startup Atlassian ended up donating $35 million to the Atlassian Foundation they established on being acquired[6]. Imagine what 1% of equity of a Flipkart or Amazon would be, and what it would mean for the organisation it goes to!
  • Mutual funds: Can mutual funds be a philanthropic instrument? HDFC Mutual Fund shows us how. In 2011, it launched a close-ended debt fund called the HDFC Debt Fund for Cancer Cure. Investors had to invest a minimum of Rs1 lakh with a lock-in period of three years. The total principal was then invested in debt/money market instruments or government securities. Investors could then choose to donate 50% or 100% of all dividend earned to the Indian Cancer Society, an organisation that sponsors treatment and therapy for patients in need. Investors could claim a tax deduction under Section 80G on any dividend amount they donated. HDFC reports that the total donations received under the scheme totaled Rs10.87 crores till December 2013[7]. A second series was launched in February 2014, with HDFC offering to match any donations made through the fund.

The world is changing at a rapid pace and philanthropy is evolving with it. We’re sure there are more innovative instruments and donation options coming in the future.

[5] ‘Rakesh Jhunjhunwala’s next target: Shed 20 kilos, give away Rs5000 crore to philanthropy’,, accessed on 4th December 2014